Self-Publishing Scandal, Brand Yourself & Writing Tips

Fall Leaves

It’s fall and in Northern California that means we have cool mornings and evenings, and warm afternoons with the temperature settling well into the 70s. There’s just a hint of winter in the cool breeze. With this type of weather it’s difficult to stay ind

Bloomsbury Seeks Deal With Author Solutions from Let’s Get Visible by David Gaughran: The publishing world has been turned upside down by ebooks and self-publishing. All the old middlemen – agents, publishers, distributors, retailers – are scrambling to reinvent themselves, trying to remain relevant in a digital world. Self-publishing is big business. By my estimates, self-publishers have captured 30% of the US e-book market. And everyone wants a slice. Unfortunately, many organizations are prepared to do pretty much anything to make sure they get theirs.

Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling from BookBaby Blog by Chris Robley: The animation studio Pixar has produced so many successful films, not because those films are full of fancy visual pyrotechnics (though they often are), but because Pixar’s writers, directors, and animators privilege plot, empathy, and character development above all else. Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats provides a glimpse into her own creative process and lists 22 rules for sturdy yet surprising narrative construction.

Brand The Author, Not The Book! from Book Promotion.com by Rachel Thompson: At least three people asked me this week the same question: do I brand myself the author or my book(s)? What happens when I release my next book(s)? To piggyback a bit off Lori’s last article ‘Why You DON’T Need A Website For Each Book‘ earlier this week (great article, please read it), I feel strongly the same concepts she spoke about in her article apply to your overall author platform. If you market your book and not you, the author, you risk not only creating all types of extra work for yourself, but diluting your branding as well.

What One of the World’s Great Novelists Learned About Writing from David Ogilvy from CopyBlogger: His novel, Midnight’s Children, won the Man Booker Prize in 1981, and in 2008 the novel was named the Best of the Bookers, the best Booker winning novel since the prizes’ inception. However, before Sir Salman Rushdie was a famous, knighted novelist, he was a copywriter under the suspender-wearing, direct marketing pioneer, David Ogilvy. Yes, that’s right. The great novelist learned from the great copywriter.

In the Digital Publishing Era, Content Trumps Platform from PublishingPerspectives by Edward Nowotka: This past Friday people working in all aspects of digital and online publishing came together to talk about the future of publishing at Rewrite the Web in Berlin.  The day-long think tank covered topics from the publishing house of the future (Dr. Siv Bublitz, Ullstein Verlag) to how we read (Henrik Berggren, Readmill), writing so we can be found (Jens Redmer, Google) and Hybrid Authorship (Joanna Penn), along with collaborative writing with readers (Ashleigh Gardner, Wattpad) and redefining journalism (Bobbie Johnson, Matter).

 

socialmediaforwritersAbout the Author: Frances Caballo is a social media strategist, trainer, and author of Social Media Just for Writers: The Best Online Marketing Tips for Selling Your Books and Blogging Just for Writers. Presently, she is the Social Media Manager for the Women’s National Book Association-SF Chapter, the San Francisco Writers Conference, and the Bay Area Independent Publishers Association. You can find her on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Google+.